CMU School of Drama

Tuesday, February 28, 2006

CMU Season Announcement

CARNEGIE MELLON SCHOOL OF DRAMA
2006-7 PRODUCTION SEASON


Grad 1 acts:
FIRST REHEARSAL: August 30, 2006
FIRST TECH: September 15, 2006
OPEN: September 20, 2006
CLOSE: September 22, 2006
VENUE: WELLS

Junior Performance Project
FIRST REHEARSAL: August 30, 2006
FIRST TECH: September 18, 2006
OPEN: September 26, 2006
CLOSE: September 30, 1006
VENUE: CHOSKY

Title House of Blue Leaves
Author John Guare (1938- )
Nationality American
Year First Produced 1971
Genre Contemporary Dark Comedy
Director Guest
Cast 6M/5F
FIRST REHEARSAL: August 29, 2006 Scene Designer: Patrick Lynch
FIRST TECH: September 25, 2006 Costume Designer: Deana Frieman
PREVIEW: October 5, 2006 Lighting Designer: Dan Henry
OPEN: October 6, 2006
CLOSE: October 14, 2006
VENUE: RAUH

Title Miss Julie
Author August Strindberg (1849-1912)
Nationality Swedish
Year First Produced 1888
Genre Naturalist Drama
Director Ed Iskandar
Cast 1M/2F
FIRST REHEARSAL: September 5, 2006
FIRST TECH: October 6, 2006
OPEN: October 11, 2006
CLOSE: October 13, 2006
VENUE: CHOSKY

Title Man is Man
Author Bertolt Brecht (1858-1956)
Nationality German
Year First Produced 1924
Genre Social Satire/Dark Comedy
Director Kathleen Aumshoff
Cast 7M/1F
Note This will be produced at a site other than the Purnell Center
FIRST REHEARSAL: October 2, 2006
FIRST TECH: November 3, 2006
OPEN: November 8, 2006
CLOSE: November 10, 2006
VENUE: OFF-SITE

Title Side Show
Author Henry Krieger
Nationality American
Year First Produced 1997
Genre Contemporary Musical
Director Guest
FIRST REHEARSAL: October 16, 2006 Scene Designer: Adam Koch
FIRST TECH: November 13, 2006 Lighting Designer: Maya Nigrosh
PREVIEW: November 30, 2006 Costume Designer: Brandon McWilliams
OPEN: December 1, 2006
CLOSE: December 9, 2006
VENUE: CHOSKY

Title Romeo and Juliet
Author William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
Nationality British
Year First Produced 1591 (perhaps)
Genre Elizabethan Tragedy
Director Laura Konsin
Cast 3M/4F for some reason
FIRST REHEARSAL: October 30, 2006
FIRST TECH: November 29, 2006
OPEN: December 6, 2006
CLOSE: December 9, 2006
VENUE: RAUH

New Works 1&2
FIRST REHEARSAL: November 27, 2006
FIRST TECH: January 29, 2007
OPEN: February 2, 2007
CLOSE: February 10, 2007
VENUE: WELLS

Title Keely & Du
Author Jane Martin
Nationality American
Year First Produced 1993
Genre Contemporary Drama
Director Kristina Ball
Cast 2M/3F
FIRST REHEARSAL: November 27, 2006
FIRST TECH: February 2, 2007
PREVIEW:
OPEN: February 7, 2007
CLOSE: February 9, 2007
VENUE: RAUH

Title The Memorandum
Author Vaclav Havel (1936- )
Nationality Czech
Year First Produced 1965
Genre Contemporary Social Satire
Director Mladen Kiselov
Cast 6M/6F
Note This will be produced at a site outside the Purnell Center
FIRST REHEARSAL: November 27, 2006
FIRST TECH: February 3, 2007
OPEN: February 7, 2007
CLOSE: February 10, 2007
VENUE: TBA-Outside Purnell

PLAYGROUND
Begins: Sunday February 11, 2007
Ends Sunday February 18th, 2007

New Works 3&4
FIRST REHEARSAL: January 26, 2007
FIRST TECH: February 19, 2007
OPEN: February 23, 2007
CLOSE: March 3, 2007
VENUE: WELLS

WQED
OPEN: March 26, 2007
CLOSE: March 29, 2007
VENUE: WQED

Title 36 Views
Author Naomi Izuka (1965- )
Nationality American
Year First Produced 2002
Genre Contemporary Drama
Director Michael Denis
Cast 3M/3F
FIRST REHEARSAL: January 16, 2007
FIRST TECH: February 23, 2007
OPEN: February 28, 2007
CLOSE: March 2, 2007
VENUE: RAUH

Title Frozen
Author Bryony Lavery (1947- )
Nationality British
Year First Produced 2002
Genre Contemporary Drama
Director Robert May
Cast 2M/2F
FIRST REHEARSAL: February 5, 2007
FIRST TECH: March 23, 2007
OPEN: March 28, 2007
CLOSE: March 30, 2007
VENUE: RAUH

Title The Oresteia Project
Author Aeschylus (525-426 bce)
Nationality Greek
Year First Produced 458 bce
Genre Classical Tragedy
Director Jed Allen Harris
Cast 15M/8F
Note Harris’ ten-year research into this play culminates in a multiple-night, multiple-venue boundary-smashing vision that fills two major production slots, a first for our School.
FIRST REHEARSAL: February 19, 2007
FIRST TECH: March 26, 2007
PREVIEW: April 12, 2007
OPEN: April 13, 2007
CLOSE: April 28, 2007
VENUE: CHOSKY

Title Woyzeck
Author Georg Büchner (1813-1837)
Nationality German
Year First Produced 1873
Genre Social Drama
Director Dan Rigazzi
Cast 5M/1F
FIRST REHEARSAL: March 19, 2007
FIRST TECH: April 14, 2007
OPEN: April 25, 2007
CLOSE: April 28, 2007
VENUE: RAUH


CARNEGIE MELLON SCHOOL OF DRAMA
2006-7 PRODUCTION SEASON
SCRIPT DOSSIERS
Written by M. Chemers

Overview The 2006-7 Season of the Carnegie Mellon School of Drama promises to be one of the strongest in our century-old history of theatre productions. The season showcases cutting-edge new works as well as presenting innovative twists on some time-honored masterpieces. We have assembled some of the most celebrated playwrights of the ages, traditional and radical, tragic and funny, ranging from the incisive wit of social satirists, to the profound moral philosophies of the classical greats, to the transcendent beauty of song and dance, all done with the inimitable and consummate dedication you have come to expect from our students, faculty and guest artists.

Title House of Blue Leaves
Author John Guare (1938- )
Nationality American
Year First Produced 1971
Genre Contemporary Dark Comedy
Director Guest
Cast 6M/5F

Plot Summary Sad clown Artie wallows in self-pity; he writes terrible songs and on top of that no one wants to listen to them. He also has to manage his loony wife Bananas and his manic mistress, Bunny. Did I mention the Pope is in town and Artie’s psychotic son Ronnie has gone AWOL in order to assassinate him? Three nuns soon show up seeking shelter, followed by a deaf (and dumb) Hollywood starlet. Luckily at the last minute a Hollywood producer shows up, deus-ex-machina style, to save everyone.

Critical Interest Although critical responses are mixed (some take issue with the mingling of genres and social commentary), this play persistently nets big awards, including an Obie, a NY Drama Critics’, and a Tony in the1986 revival. Like much of Guare’s writing, this one is about the fear of obscurity, and the lengths to which people will go for their fifteen minutes of fame. It’s about the malaise that sets in following the failure of the American dream, about waking from a drug-induced stupor with strung-out has-been celebrities to find the whole world’s gone down the tubes and your government has dragged you into an illegitimate war. Uh, Viet Nam, I mean.

Author Bio John Guare is probably best know for his Six Degrees of Separation. Raised in Queens, Guare completed a playwrighting MFA at Yale in 1963. Guare was a founding member of the O’Neill Theatre Center, and was the resident playwright of the New York Shakespeare Festival. Louis Malle wrote of him that he “practices a humor that is synonymous with lucidity, exploding genre and clichés, taking us to the core of human suffering: the awareness of corruption in our own bodies, death circling in. We try to fight it all by creating various mythologies, and it is Guare's peculiar aptitude for exposing these grandiose lies of ours that makes his work so magical.”

Title Side Show
Author Henry Krieger
Nationality American
Year First Produced 1997
Genre Contemporary Musical
Director Guest
Cast

Plot Summary Based, extremely loosely, on the real-life show-business sisters, Daisy and Violet Hilton. Conjoined twins possessed of great beauty and musical talent, the historical Daisy and Violet led highly visible but very unglamorous and violent lives in the Depression-era United States. This play is a fictionalized treatment of the young sisters as they leave off music to begin careers in vaudeville. They must negotiate the dangers of fame and romantic entanglements while simultaneously living two very different lives in one body.

Critical Interest In the late 90’s, the show attracted a fanatic following before closing (some say prematurely) on Broadway. The script is not uncontroversial, as many disability rights advocates see the freak show tradition it romanticizes as the Amos n’ Andy of disability. Nevertheless, Side Show combines some unique theatricality with an enchanting score, brilliant strong acting and singing roles for two women, and opportunities for amazing design elements that span the aesthetic spectrum from the grotesque to the sublime.

Author Bio Kreiger is best-known for his score for the Broadway Dreamgirls, for which he was awarded a Grammy and nominated for a Tony and a Drama Desk Award. Side Show was nominated for a Tony in 1998. Krieger did net two Tonys for his score of The Tap Dance Kid.


Title The Oresteia Project
Author Aeschylus (525-426 bce)
Nationality Greek
Year First Produced 458 bce
Genre Classical Tragedy
Director Jed Allen Harris
Cast 15M/8F

Note Harris’ ten-year research into this play culminates in a multiple-night, multiple-venue boundary-smashing vision that fills two major production slots, a first for our School.

Plot Summary Part I, Agamemnon. The great leader is returning triumphant from the Trojan War, but at home, the terrible price he paid to sail to Troy (his daughter’s life) is coming due. Clytemnestra, his queen, conspires with her lover and husband’s cousin, Aegisthus, to murder her husband. Aesgisthus also has a debt to be repaid; Agamemnon’s father Atreus murdered Aegisthus’ siblings and fed them to their own father, Atreus’ brother Thyestes. Agamemnon slain, these karmic debts are repaid, but with worthless Aegisthus on the throne and a new blood crime to be avenged, all is not well.

Part II, The Choëphoræ, Orestes returns to find his father’s city in ruins, and his sister Elektra enjoins him, along with Apollo, to avenge his father’s murder. The theme of the play is largely meditations on the audacity and shamelessness of human action, as the leaders behave with such amorality to satisfy their passions. Orestes, caught in a moral abomination (damned if he does, damned if he doesn’t), executes his mother and so condemns himself to persecution from the chthonic forces of primal vengeance, the Furies.

Part III, The Eumenides. Pursued by the Furies, Orestes seeks asylum in Athens, where Apollo and Athena contest with the Furies over his fate. In the end, the horrific primal vengeance demons are subdued; all things being equal, Athena’s vote introduces mercy into the cosmic scheme, and the Furies are transformed into “the Kindly Ones,” but Athena reserves the right to release them again should the leaders of men ever lose their moral compasses and use their power to act wickedly with impunity.

Critical Interest The greatest oeuvre of the greatest playwright of all time, Oresteia contains all the glories of Aeschylus’ genius. William von Humboldt wrote of it that “among all the products of the Greek stage none can compare with it in tragic power; no other play shows the same intensity and pureness of belief in the divine and good; none can surpass the lessons it teaches, and the wisdom of which it is the mouthpiece.”

Author Bio Son of Euphorion, Aeschylus was noble-born. Set to watch his father’s vineyard as a boy, he was visited by the god Dionysos who advised him to go into playwriting. Young Aeschylus began writing for, and winning, the newly-established Athenian Drama Festival. With his Seven Against Thebes, his status as “the father of tragedy” was established and remains to this day undisputed. He is credited with establishing the second actor, diminishing the chorus, setting the “no violence onstage” decency standard, and innovating spectacular design concepts, particularly in costuming. The reception of his aristocratic masterwork, Oresteia, in democratic Athens, however, was so disappointing to him that it drove him into a self-imposed exile in Sicily, where an eagle, mistaking his bald head for a stone, dropped a tortoise on him from an extreme height, killing him instantly. Or so it is written.


Title Romeo and Juliet
Author William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
Nationality British
Year First Produced 1591 (perhaps)
Genre Elizabethan Tragedy
Director Laura Konsin
Cast 3M/4F for some reason

Plot Summary This play follows the misfortunes of the original star-crossed lovers, children of feuding families in 16th century Verona. The intransigence of their respective clans forces the lovers to marry in secret; but the intrigue leads to murder, banishment, civic unrest, and the tragically beautiful ending that is cemented in the cultural consciousness of the English-speaking world.

Critical Interest The uber-play of tragic romances, this play is the most celebrated work of Shakespeare and is considered one of the most definitively characteristic plays of the English Renaissance. It is certainly one of the most revived, most translated to film, and most imitated plays in history.

Author Bio Born in Warwickshire in England, Shakespeare’s life remains a hotly-debated mystery. It seems likely that he fled an unhappy marriage to break into the London theatre scene in the 1580’s, where he joined the Admiral’s Men (later the King’s Men). A favorite playwright to the courts of Elizabeth and James, Shakespeare became the most widely-produced author in England and America in the 17th through the 19th centuries and heavily influenced the work of German classical and modern writers. Shakespeare is now widely considered the greatest dramatic writer of the English language, combining powerful moral themes, intense theatricality, sophisticated plots, psychologically complex characters, and elegant poetry.


Title Woyzeck
Author Georg Büchner (1813-1837)
Nationality German
Year First Produced 1873
Genre Social Drama
Director Dan Rigazzi
Cast 5M/1F

Plot Summary Woyzeck is an Army barber, tormented by a callow Captain, who earns money by allowing an amoral Doctor to conduct purposeless experiments on him. His girlfriend, with whom he has a son, is unfaithful to him with a Drum Major. Which of these degradations turns Woyzeck into a murderer? That depends entirely on the dramaturgy.

Critical Interest Little can be said about Woyzeck that is not the subject of intense scholarly debate. It is the first German literary work to have a working-class protagonist. Woyzeck is meant to be a dark version of Everyman, dehumanized by callous cruelty and the political and moral absolutism of his society. The play combines Expressionism and Naturalism in ways that would become powerfully influential in the creation of German social drama. What’s amazing, however, is that he did this in 1837, long before these movements had begun to take hold. The play, unfinished, lay in his desk after his death, untouched, for decades. Even in 1873, when it was rediscovered and published, no one knew for sure what order the thirteen scenes were meant to take. This makes Woyzeck singularly adaptable to the vision of a strong director.

Author Bio Born near Darmstadt, the son of a doctor, Büchner studied medicine and mental health in Strasbourg. In 1828 he became involved with a Shakespeare reading group with strong humanist leanings; they would eventually become part of the Society for Human Rights (Gessellschaft für Menschenrechte). Büchner became a translator of French works, including those of Victor Hugo, and became influenced by the utopianism of Saint-Simon. He founded a secret society dedicated to the liberation of peasants. Accused of treason, he fled to France, where in 1835 he wrote Danton’s Death and Lenz, followed by Leonce and Lena in 1836. Woyzeck, probably begun that same year, was never completed. He was invited to Zürich to lecture at university, where he died shortly after arriving. It is generally held to be true that had Büchner lived longer, he would have a place among the greatest of German dramatists.


Title The Memorandum
Author Vaclav Havel (1936- )
Nationality Czech
Year First Produced 1965
Genre Contemporary Social Satire
Director Mladen Kiselov
Cast 6M/6F
Note This will be produced at a site outside the Purnell Center

Plot Summary A government office is instructed to conduct all its business in a new official language, Ptydepe; never mind that no one can understand it. The bureaucracy becomes entirely devoted to finding meaning in this strange code. Language breaks down entirely. The office workers begin to be unable to determine who is working, arguing, agreeing, or flirting. Sinister forces take advantage of the confusion to promote an insidious new order. A minor administrator sees the truth and tries to save the company, but the forces arrayed against him (or her) are devastating.

Critical Interest The second play of a man who would become one of Europe’s leading moral, intellectual, and political figures, The Memorandum combines the cutting social insights of Woyzeck with the desperate humor of Dilbert, drawing into stark clarity the dehumanizing effect of the pointless activity that dominates modern life. Some will see this as a powerful philosophical inquiry into modern life; but anyone who has worked in an office will see it, alas, as a documentary!

Author Bio Václav Havel was born to a family closely linked to anti-communist progressivism in Czechoslovakia. Denied other careers because of this connection, he worked as a stage technician and studied Drama by correspondence, in the 1960’s becoming a resident playwright of the “Theatre of the Balustrade.” Following the military invasion of the Prague Spring, Havel stood against the communist "normalization" and became a founder of the revolutionary Charter 77. He was imprisoned three times and spent nearly five years behind bars. In 1989 a massive uprising, which began as a meeting of a University Drama Club, resulted in the democratic “Velvet Revolution.” Havel was elected President by the Federal Assembly of Czechoslovakia. In his inaugural address, he promised to lead the nation to free elections, which he fulfilled in the summer of 1990. He was re-elected, but rifts soon developed between the ethnic Czech and Slovak communities. Disgusted by the refusal of these parties to reconcile, Havel resigned the Presidency. However, he was re-elected by the new Czech Republic in 1998.


Title Miss Julie
Author August Strindberg (1849-1912)
Nationality Swedish
Year First Produced 1888
Genre Naturalist Drama
Director Ed Iskandar
Cast 1M/2F

Plot Summary A servant plays a dangerous game of seduction and violence with a volatile noblewoman. Jean, a groom with aspirations of equality and delusions of adequacy, flirts with the unpredictable daughter of the Count who employs him. Miss Julie is on the rebound from a broken engagement; the young man took exception to her “training program,” as she made him jump hedges while beating him mercilessly. Jean spins fairy tales of love and seduces the confused Julie. When her heart and her reputation is at his mercy, however, Jean turns abusive, ready to force Julie to run away with him, or kill herself. All too soon, the authority of the shadowy Count reasserts itself… which of these midsummer dreams and nightmares will survive the harsh glare of reality?

Critical Interest Along with fellow-Scandinavian Henrik Ibsen, Strindberg is hailed as a founder of the Naturalist school of playwriting, for which Miss Julie (particularly its preface) acts as a kind of manifesto. Eschewing the contrived plots and shallow characterizations of melodrama, the Naturalists rigidly adhered to an honest realism of storytelling and diction, and a psychological complexity of character. His straightforwardness, however, made Strindberg particularly unpopular with religious leaders and the emerging women’s rights movement. Based on the Zola short story “The Sin of Father Moulet,” Miss Julie was censored for its content, and many critics found its blatant, Darwinian themes distasteful.

Author Bio Misogynist, alchemist, anti-Semite, blasphemer, sometimes magnificent, sometimes pathetic, definitely unbalanced, Strindberg was tormented by inner demons throughout his life. Born to an unhappy family in Stockholm, Strindberg believed his parent’s antipathy was due to their class difference (he was a shipping magnate, she a former servant). At various times an actor, librarian, and journalist, he himself married out of his own class, to the flamboyant noble-born actress Siri von Essen. He wrote confused, hate-filled novels, consumed with paranoid visions, largely about Siri, but he is chiefly known as a founder of the naturalist school of European playwriting. Strindberg’s writing career was put on hold in the 1890’s as he suffered a series of psychotic episodes, but between 1898 and his death in 1912, he wrote some 36 plays and developed the concept of “intimate theatre.”


Title Man is Man
Author Bertolt Brecht (1858-1956)
Nationality German
Year First Produced 1924
Genre Social Satire/Dark Comedy
Director Kathleen Aumshoff
Cast 7M/1F
Note This will be produced at a site other than the Purnell Center

Plot Summary The year is 1925; the place, India. Gayly Gay heads out to buy a fish for his wife to prepare for dinner. He gets mixed up with three soldiers who have looted a temple. In fear of the sadistic Sgt. Fairchild, who is trying to seduce the bombshell Widow Begbick, the trio enlists Gay as a stand-in for their comrade, lost when he tried to move the temple treasure box with his head. Gay’s transformation into the lost machine-gunner is complicated when he is offered the ownership of an imaginary army elephant. In the end, it is the story of how easily an innocent can be seduced into atrocity, and that any given man is nor more good, and no less expendable, than the next.

Critical Interest An much-beloved play from the father of radical theatre, Man is Man shows Brecht’s early experiments in the creation of Verfremsdungseffekt, or “estrangement” of the audience from the action of the play. Brecht’s radical theatre seeks to engage the mind, not the passions of the viewer. Brecht’s dramatic technique, specifically anti-Aristotlean, is an amalgam of Shakespearean and Asian methods, with a healthy dose of German cabaret and Marxism. Worried about the pernicious influence of capitalism on the intellectual health of the theatre (market-successful plays tend to be philosophically and politically unchallenging), he worked tirelessly to redefine the relationship between audience and art object, and to make the theatre a tool of social liberation. Although the Widow is in some ways an ancestor of Mother Courage, Man is Man highlights the use of slapstick, stage magic and intense, overt theatricality. Original productions in Germany featured Peter Lorre as the hapless Gay.

Author’s Bio Born in Bavaria, where he studied medicine and worked as an army doctor until 1924, Brecht wrote his first play, Baal, in 1923. Virulently anti-bourgeois and a student of Karl Korsch, Brecht traveled to Berlin to work for directors Erwin Piscator and Max Reinhardt, and with composer Kurt Weill, doing innovative playwriting, directing, and dramaturgical work with the Berliner Ensemble. The rise of German Nazism made him persona non grata and in 1933 he fled to Denmark, and to the United States to work in Hollywood from 1941-1947. Back home, his books were burned in Nazi pyres, but after the war he was forced to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee, who were on a witch hunt for communists in show business. To HUAC, Brecht famously lied through his teeth, then returned to Europe, where he wrote theoretical works. He was celebrated in Paris and Moscow, where he received the Stalin Peace Prize in 1955. He would die of a heart attack a year later. One of the most controversial theorists in modern theatre, Bertolt Brecht was decribed by Peter Brook as “the key figure of our time, and all theatre work today at some point starts or returns to his statements and achievement.”


Title 36 Views
Author Naomi Izuka (1965- )
Nationality American
Year First Produced 2002
Genre Contemporary Drama
Director Michael Denis
Cast 3M/3F

Plot Summary Inspired by the artist Hosukai’s visual masterwork “36 Views of Mount Fuji,” this play is composed of 36 connected scenes. When an amoral vendor of Japanese art discovers what he thinks is an antique “pillow book” that will revolutionize the understanding of Asian aesthetics, he becomes hoist by his own petard. The book is actually the rambling draft of a novel by his assistant, John, but a net of lies is woven around the book so thickly that the characters cannot escape the intrigue, seduction, and danger that follows as luminaries of the art world vie for a piece of the action. It’s a complex tale in which lies deftly become truth, each of the scenes interlocking to form a delicate and beautiful whole that leaves the viewer wondering where dreams end and reality begins.

Critical Interest George Santayana’s edict that art is most successful when the content and aesthetics coincide seems to be the guiding principle of this play. While critics have trouble with the play’s rather contrived plotline (which hearkens back to the cozener-cozened stories of Jonson and Moliere) and apparent lack of character development, 36 Views is also an opportunity for some brilliant postmodern design, as the elegantly transcendent world of kabuki-era Japan collides with the unpoetic mercantilism of the modern world. To what extent does art owe its existence to the exchange of capital: financial in terms of the wheeler-dealer world of art collectors, and for the world of academics, in terms of prestige?

Author Bio Born in Tokyo to a Japanese father and Latina mother, raised in Holland, Indonesia, and Washington D.C., Naomi Izuka is one of the most startling new voices in American theatre. Izuka’s plays have garnered a Whiting Award, a McKnight Fellowship, an NEA/TCG Artist-in-Residence Fellowship, Princeton’s Hodder Fellowship, a Jerome Fellowship, and a PEN Center USA West Award. Izuka’s most celebrated works, like 36 Views and Polaroid Stories, are ones in which ancient and modern worlds collide and collude in fascinating ways.


Title Frozen
Author Bryony Lavery (1947- )
Nationality British
Year First Produced 2002
Genre Contemporary Drama
Director Robert May
Cast 2M/2F

Plot Summary A deadly serious play, Frozen takes the audience into one of the darkest regions of human experience; the world of homicidal pedophilia, and the aftermath of the most unspeakable acts conceivable. After 10-year old Rhona disappears, apparently the victim of a killer pedophile, her mother Nancy remains psychologically frozen in a condition of irrational hope, locked to a moment in time when her daughter was still unviolated and alive. Nancy becomes involved with Agnetha, an academic looking to justify the most heinous acts of evil, and mysterious drifter Ralph, and the embark on a journey of discovery so dreadful that it numbs the mind and chills the blood.

Critical Interest Responses to this play are dramatically mixed: staging a parent’s worst nightmare is bound to draw at the heartstrings, but at what cost? Is the play a sophomoric meditation on evil within an irrationally evangelical diatribe, or a horrifying excursion into the worst aspects of the human condition? Either way, the play leaves viewers with their blood running cold. Another point of interest: in 2004 Lavery admitted to plagiarizing parts of the play from a 1997 New Yorker article about the work of psychiatrist Dorothy Lewis, who was scandalized at what she perceived to be her portrayal in the character of Agnetha.

Author Bio Raised in Dewsbury, England, Lavery came out as a lesbian rather late in life. She was active in the Women’s Movement in the 1970’s, when she became instrumental in the rise of the politically radical fringe theatre scene. Artistic Director of the Gay Sweatshop and Female Trouble theatre troupes, Lavery teaches playwriting at Birmingham University in the UK. Author of more than 20 plays , tv scripts, and books, including a biography of Tallulah Bankhead, Lavery notes “I’m good at grief, death, sex, and anger. They are my specialist subjects.”


Title Keely & Du
Author Jane Martin
Nationality American
Year First Produced 1993
Genre Contemporary Drama
Director Kristina Ball
Cast 2M/3F

Plot Summary Keely, three-months pregnant and seeking to terminate her pregnancy, is kidnapped by the pastor of an anti-abortion church-qua-detention center. Handcuffed to a bed and cared for by jailer/nurse Du, Keely is forced to bring her baby to term. In the end, as secrets are gradually revealed, a profound exploration into the reaches of human fear emerges between the endless bromides and empty shibboleths of each extreme of this unresolvable social problem.

Critical Interest Emerging as it did during the eruption of abortion as the hot-button issue of American politics in the early 90’s, this decidedly unbalanced, pro-choice play plays upon the illogical extremes of the anti-abortion movement and its evangelical rationalization and justification of outrageous acts. Nevertheless, the character of Du reveals that the absurdities of the pro-life crowd are grounded in a certain sensibility of Christian love, albeit a ridiculously narrowly-defined one. One thing’s for sure: whichever side of the abortion debate you’re on, Keely & Du will really tick you off.

Author Bio Despite her nomination for a Pulitzer and other prestigious awards, the true identity of the mysterious Jane Martin remains one of the worst-kept secrets in American theatre. Jane Martin is almost certainly a pseudonym for Jon Jory, for many years Artistic Director of the Actor’s Theatre of Louisville, which produced a great many of Jane Martin’s works. Many theatre insiders have observed that the elaborately-constructed identity provided a cover for Jory as a rather flimsy affectation, and also to avoid charges of self-interest in producing and directing his own plays at ATL’s expense. Nevertheless, Jory has been a champion of new theatre in America, fostering young playwrights and innovative directors for many decades. He left the Actor’s Theatre in 2001 to join the acting faculty at the University of Washington’s School of Drama.


CARNEGIE MELLON SCHOOL OF DRAMA
2006-7 PRODUCTION SEASON
Brochure Copy

M. Chemers

House of Blue Leaves Sad clown Artie wallows in self-pity; he writes terrible songs and on top of that no one wants to listen to them. He also has to manage his loony wife Bananas and his manic mistress, Bunny. Did I mention the Pope is in town and Artie’s psychotic son Ronnie has gone AWOL in order to assassinate him? Also some nuns show up, and a starlet. Like much of Guare’s writing, this one is about the lengths to which people will go for their fifteen minutes of fame, about the malaise that sets in following the failure of the American dream, about waking from a drug-induced stupor to find the whole world’s gone down the tubes and your government has dragged you into an illegitimate war.

Side Show Based, extremely loosely, on the real-life show-business sisters, Daisy and Violet Hilton. Conjoined twins possessed of great beauty and musical talent, the historical Daisy and Violet led highly visible but very unglamorous and violent lives in the Depression-era United States. The sisters must negotiate the dangers of fame and romantic entanglements while simultaneously living two very different lives in one body. Side Show combines an enchanting score, brilliant strong acting and singing roles for two women, and opportunities for amazing design elements that span the aesthetic spectrum from the grotesque to the sublime.

The Oresteia The greatest oeuvre of the greatest playwright of all time, Oresteia contains all the glories of Aeschylus’ genius. Young Orestes must avenge his father Agamemnon’s death by slaying his murderer, Orestes’ mother Clytemnestra. Either way, he will invoke the immortal punishment of the chthonic demons, the Furies. William von Humboldt wrote of it that “among all the products of the Greek stage none can compare with it in tragic power; no other play shows the same intensity and pureness of belief in the divine and good; none can surpass the lessons it teaches, and the wisdom of which it is the mouthpiece.” School of Drama Directing Professor Jed Allen Harris’ ten-year research into this play culminates in a multiple-night, multiple-venue boundary-smashing vision that promise to take this ancient text to new aesthetic heights.

Romeo and Juliet The uber-play of tragic romances, R & J follows the misfortunes of the original star-crossed lovers, children of feuding families in 16th century Verona. The intransigence of their respective clans forces the lovers to marry in secret; but the intrigue leads to murder, banishment, civic unrest, and the tragically beautiful ending that is cemented in the cultural consciousness of the English-speaking world. The most celebrated work of William Shakespeare, it is considered definitive of the English Renaissance, and is certainly one of the most revived, most translated to film, and most imitated plays in history.

Woyzeck Woyzeck is an Army barber, dehumanized by callous cruelty and the political and moral absolutism of his society. He is tormented by a callow Captain and an amoral Doctor who conducts purposeless experiments on him. His girlfriend, with whom he has a son, is unfaithful to him with a Drum Major. Which of these degradations turns Woyzeck into a murderer? The mystery surrounding this play’s strange authorship makes Woyzeck singularly adaptable to the vision of a strong director.

The Memorandum A government office is instructed to conduct all its business in a new official language; never mind that no one can understand it. Tied to the loony lingo, the office workers are unable to determine who is working, arguing, agreeing, or flirting. Sinister forces take advantage of the confusion to promote an insidious new order. A minor administrator sees the truth and tries to save the company, but the forces arrayed against him are diabolical and devastating. An early work of a man who would become one of Europe’s leading moral, intellectual, and political figures, The Memorandum combines the cutting social insights of Woyzeck with the desperate humor of Dilbert. Some will see this as a powerful commentary on modern life; but anyone who has worked in an office may see it, alas, as a documentary!

Miss Julie A servant plays a dangerous game of seduction and violence with a volatile noblewoman. Jean, a groom with aspirations of equality and delusions of adequacy, flirts with the unpredictable daughter of the Count who employs him. Miss Julie is on the rebound from a broken engagement. Jean spins fairy tales of love and seduces the confused heiress. When her heart and her reputation is at her mercy, however, Jean turns abusive, ready to force Julie to run away with him, or kill herself. All too soon, the authority of the shadowy Count reasserts itself… which of these summertime dreams and nightmares will survive the harsh truth of reality? Misogynist, alchemist, by turns magnificent and psychotic, August Strindberg was tormented by inner demons throughout his life; this play is considered his greatest contribution to Naturalist theatre.

Man is Man The year is 1925; the place, India. Gayly Gay heads out to buy a fish for his wife to prepare for dinner. He gets mixed up with three soldiers who have looted a temple. In fear of the sadistic Sgt. Fairchild, who is trying to seduce the bombshell Widow Begbick the trio enlist Gay as a stand in for their comrade, lost when he tried to move the temple treasure box with his head. Gay’s transformation into the lost machine-gunner is complicated when he is offered the ownership of an imaginary army elephant. In the end, it is the story of how easily an innocent can be seduced into atrocity, and that any given man is nor more good, and no less expendable, than the next. A much-beloved play from the father of radical theatre.

36 Views Inspired by the artist Hosukai’s visual masterwork “36 Views of Mount Fuji,” this play is composed of 36 connected scenes. When an amoral vendor of Japanese art discovers what he thinks is an antique “pillow book” that will revolutionize the understanding of Asian aesthetics, he becomes hoist by his own petard. The book is actually the rambling draft of a novel by his assistant, John, but a net of lies is woven around the book so thickly that the characters cannot escape the intrigue, seduction, and danger that follows as luminaries of the art world vie for a piece of the action. It’s a complex tale in which lies deftly become truth, each of the scenes interlocking to form a delicate and beautiful whole that leaves the viewer wondering where dreams end and reality begins

Frozen This deadly serious play takes the audience into one of the darkest regions of human experience; the world of homicidal pedophilia. After 10-year old Rhona disappears, her mother Nancy remains psychologically frozen in a condition of irrational hope. Nancy becomes involved with an academic looking to explain (and justify) the most heinous acts of evil, and mysterious drifter Ralph, and the embark on a journey of discovery so dreadful that it numbs the mind and chills the blood. A fringe theatre innovator and author of more than 20 plays, tv scripts, and books, including a biography of Tallulah Bankhead, Lavery notes “I’m good at grief, death, sex, and anger. They are my specialist subjects.”

Keely & Du Keely, three-months pregnant and seeking to terminate her pregnancy, is kidnapped by the pastor of an anti-abortion church-qua-detention center. Handcuffed to a bed and cared for by jailer/nurse Du, Keely is forced to bring her baby to term. In the end, as secrets are gradually revealed, a profound exploration into the reaches of human fear emerges between the endless bromides and empty shibboleths of each extreme of this seemingly-unresolvable social problem.

Franco Zeffirelli To Receive The Robert L. B. Tobin Award For Lifetime Achievement In Theatrical Design

Live Design

IATSE Dissidents Take Aim at Agreement

Backstage

Pittsburgh Public Theater names managing director

Post Gazette

Tips for Long Public Speaking

lifehack.org

Australian to take charge of Edinburgh's debt-ridden festival

Independent Online Edition > News

Did Critics Have a Bloody Good Time at McDonagh's Inishmore?

Broadway.com Buzz

Broadway in Chicago plagued by changes

Sun Times

Apple Tree has right RX for 'Allergist's Wife'

Sun Times

Not So Fantastick: Old Sullivan Street Playhouse to Be Supplanted by New Condo

Playbill News

'Happy' jumps the shark

LA Times

Monday, February 27, 2006

Costume designers celebrate the best

Tribune Review

Job

Assistant Technical Director
Shakespeare & Company
70 Kemble Street
Lenox, MA 01240
phone: 413-637-1199
fax: 413-637-4274
Contact: Nathan Towne-Smith
E-Mail: production@shakespeare.org
Starts: May 1, 2006
Duration: 9/4 (but earlier end date could be negotiated, possibly as early as 8/17)
Pay: negotiable depending on experience; housing included


ATD for Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA Start Date 5/1 Housing included. Work with professional designers in a well-equipped, large scene shop. 4+ show season in repertory. Shop staff: TD, ATD, Master Carpt, two Carpenters, interns. Last show opens 8/4. Contract end date negotiable. Skills needed: drafting, budgeting, supervisory, carpentry, welding. MFA students encouraged to apply. Contact Nathan for more details. Visit: www.shakespeare.org.

Dates: May 1, 2006-Dec 31, 1969
Pay: negotiable

Primary Stages' '06-'07 Season Features Works by Durang, McNally and Gurney (BroadwayWorld.com)

Broadway World.com

Mountain Productions Requires Safety Training Of Staff

LIve Design

Theater News - Theater News: 2006 Laurence Olivier Award Winners Announced -

TheatreMania

Ride teen fell from passes inspection

MiamiHerald.com

[title of show] - Review

Theater - New York Times

Getting To Done: Communication - A guide to email triage

Lifehacker

Beaux Arts Ball returns

The Tartan Online

Penn Hills native has 'Wicked' swing

Post Gazette

Stage Review: Musical Theater delivers solid 'Superstar'

Post Gazette

Saturday, February 25, 2006

Technical Design - Shop Biography

[20:03] Biographer: hi David. What should we do if one of the scene shops on our list has fallen from the face of the earth?
[20:04] eProf: I think that you identify that they are out of business
[20:04] eProf: and you need to detail what lengths you went to establish that fact
[20:04] Biographer: k
[20:04] Biographer: thanks

'50s and '60s Bands Aim to Stop Copycats

AOL News

PNC Broadway brings Pittsburgh a 'Wicked' show - PittsburghLIVE.com

Tribune Review

Art of 'Listening' is often tedious

Sun Times

Friday, February 24, 2006

LECTURE: Muses in the Library

Environmental artist/poet and professor of art Lowry Burgess will speak Wednesday March 1, from noon-1 pm, in Rangos 3, University Center.

ABSTRACT It is my contention that as the 'cyber-ization' of information provides more and more disembodied information access, the physical library becomes eroticized (a place of direct social and sensory contact) and more a 'muse-eum' where the various muses dwell -- those companions of Apollo, guardian of boundless human inspiration. The new library becomes a 'Wunderkammer,' a place for 'musing' and wonder, a place of direct contact and interaction with people, ideas, and multiple library objects and systems. However, existing information systems are generally blind to human factors and exhibit a preponderance of 'geek-dumb.' I propose that multimedia and integrated media projects and interfaces could effectively interact with and enhance the actuality of a library, creating an ideal new library. The challenge is to envision such a library and to build test projects to inform future library systems and physical design at Carnegie Mellon. BIO Lowry Burgess is an internationally renowned environmental artist/poet and educator. He is Professor of Art and former dean of the College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon. He is a distinguished fellow in the Studio for Creative Inquiry that supports advanced research in the interdisciplinary arts and a member of the Center for the Arts and Society, both at Carnegie Mellon. Among other distinguished academic appointments, he was a fellow and senior consultant at the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for 25 years. His artworks and documents are in museums, archives and collections in the US , Europe and Japan . He is a staunch library supporter and patron.

This talk concludes the 2006 Digital Libraries Colloquium series, presented each year by Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science, University of Pittsburgh School of Information Sciences, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Library System, and Carnegie Mellon University Libraries.

Oops...

In the words of a consultant friend: "this is why you want compitent riggers"

oops

Final Friday

Got the late night munchies???

Let some of the Senior Girl and Freshman Boy MTs
satisfy your hunger at the Final Friday Cabaret...

"IF FOOD BE THE MUSIC OF LOVE"

It's sure to be a tasty treat you won't soon
forget!!!

Featuring:
The Senior Ladies...Patina Miller, Johanna Brickey, and Marissa Lesch
The Freshman Gents...Nic Cory, Kyle Beltran, and Zak Resnick
And Maestro Extraordinaire, Thomas Douglas

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 24th @ 11PM in the RAUH

$5 Tickets Available at the Box Office

All Proceeds From Ticket Sales Benefit the Senior Showcase

Jobs

Bayview Music Festival announces artistic and production staff openings for its 2006 summer festival season

Bay View, America’s oldest music festival, is located in Petoskey, Michigan, on Little Traverse Bay on Lake Michigan. A picturesque American Victorian town is the backdrop for the festival.

The employment dates are June 14- August 17. The productions are:

Private Lives, Kiss Me, Kate, and La Traviata,

as well as a short tour and youth theatre production.


Available positions are:

Technical Director, Assistant TD/Props Carpenter, Scenic Artist/Design Assistant, Props Master, Costume Shop Stitcher


Internships available in:

Carpentry/Electrics, and Carpentry

Please e-mail for detailed job descriptions.

All positions are paid, and housing is provided.

Persons with dual skills and interests are especially sought.

Please send a resume, contact information for three professional references, and other pertinent information as soon as possible to:

Mark Kobak

Director of Theatre Arts/Set Designer

Bay View Music Festival

13051 Cedar Road

Cleveland, Ohio 44118-2751

(Winter address)

E-mail: markkobak@aol.com

No phone calls please.

Let the tube take over

Chicago Tribune

Did Critics Find Ample Steam Heat in Roundabout's Pajama Game Revival?

Broadway.com Buzz

THEATER CHAT: 'Avenue Q' might still succeed in smaller venue

reviewjournal.com

Inside Move: 'Rings' working out its preview kinks

Variety.com

'Q' WAS A NO-WYNN SITUATION

New York Post Online Edition: entertainment

Stage Review: 'Wicked' a clever retelling of mythical Oz

Post Gazette

The Many Faces of Shakespeare: Is This One Really His?

New York Times

To: Professor@University.edu Subject: Why It's All About Me

New York Times

Thursday, February 23, 2006

Jazz Vocal Ensemble

The Jazz Vocal Ensemble will perform at

D's Hot Dog Shop
This Saturday
Saturday, February 25
7-10:00 pm
1118 S. Braddock Avenue
Regent Square

Melanie Goerlitz, Emily Becker, Anna Vogelzang, Kami Smith, Emily
Righter, Danielle Griswold, Alia Chaib, Morgan Springer, Devin Ilaw,
Tyler Rubensaal, Sam McUmber, Eric Longo, Mike McKee, Josh Fishbein,
Kwasi Mensah

Thomas Douglas, director with Rich Kawood, drums and Andrew Young, bass.

'Star,' 'Yellowman' Sweep L.A. Theatre Awards

Backstage

Stage Review: Sprawling 'Black Mariner' gets lost at sea

Post Gazette

Stage Preview: Tome Cousin throws his boundless energy into Point Park production

Post Gazette

One last Shadyside show, and Clay heads for Carnegie

Post Gazette

Robotic actors and egg drums

we make money not art

'Shakespeare was daring - why aren't new writers?'

Guardian Unlimited | Arts features

Green with envy - PittsburghLIVE.com

Tribune Review

Purlie Victorious

Pittsburgh City Paper - Performance

China Bans Cartoons With Live Actors

CBS News

Nemetschek North America Updates VectorWorks Product Line to Version 12.0.1

Lighting&Sound America Online - News

'Dolittle' does little to push it

LA Times

Wednesday, February 22, 2006

Carnegie Mellon College of Fine Arts Announcement: WEEK of February 27- March 5, Centennial, Campus Events, PGH Events

CFA Centennial____________________________________________

ONLY 6 DAYS LEFT TO BUY YOUR BEAUX ARTS BALL TICKETS

$40 for Students
$75 for Alumni, Faculty, Staff

Call 412-268-2407 or visit the School of Drama box office in the Purnell Center for the Arts between noon- 5 p.m. February 28 is the last day for tickets!

Campus Events____________________________________________

Carnegie Mellon School of Drama's 2006 Winter New Play Festival Continues

February 8-March 4, 2006

All performances are FREE and take place in the John Wells Studio in the Purnell Center for the Arts. For more info: 412-268-2407.

Schedule as follows:
CHERRY SMOKE
a play by James McManus
directed by Dan Rigazzi

"A fighter and his girl struggle for survival in a world destined to crush them."

Thurs 3/2 @ 7:30 PM
Fri 3/3 @ 8 PM
Sat 3/4 @ 2 PM

THE RED CRAVAT
a play by Lulin Yu
directed by Matt Gray

"A young Chinese woman seeks revenge on the father who abandoned her and her mother during the Cultural Revolution."

Thurs 2/23 @ 7:30 PM
Fri 2/24 @ 8 PM
Sat 2/25 @ 2 PM

Wed 3/1 @ 7:30 PM
Fri 3/3 @ 4 PM
Sat 3/4 @ 8 PM

_______________

Carnegie Mellon School of Drama will present ELEGIES FOR ANGELS, PUNKS, AND RAGING QUEENS by Bill Russell and Janet Hood on Friday, March 3rd. Show Times are 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. in the Kresge Theater in the College of Fine Arts Building.

This Piece is a Celebration of the lives of men and women who have died from the onset of AIDS in the early 1980's, told though Stories and Songs.

The Cast will include both Junior and Senior Actors/Musical Theater Majors, as well as Carnegie Mellon Faculty, with Faculty Gary Kline Directing.

While there is no Admission Charge, donations will be accepted at the Door at the end of the Show, with proceeds being split between the Shepherd Wellness Community in service of those affected by AIDS, and the Carnegie Mellon SHOWCASE.

PGH Events________________________________________________


Friday, February 24, 2006, 7pm
Opening Reception: Photovoices
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Filmmakers Galleries, 477 Melwood Avenue, Oakland
Photovoices is an exhibition of images and ideas by an active group of Latino photographers, videographers, installation artists, and health advocates who seek to illustrate the themes and strengths of Pittsburgh's Latino Community, widely regarded as "invisible" in Western Pennsylvania. Free and open to the public. For more information please call 412.681.5449 or visit www.pghfilmmakers.org.

Thru February 23, 2006
After Innocence
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Harris Theater, 809 Liberty Ave., Downtown
In this dramatic and compelling story, seven innocent men, wrongfully imprisoned for decades and then released after DNA evidence proved their innocence, are thrust back into society with little or no support from the system that put them behind bars. The film raises questions about human rights and society's moral obligation to the exonerated and places a spotlight on the flaws in our criminal justice system. It is the first feature film about the exonerated, and was made in collaboration with the Innocence Project, a nonprofit legal clinic founded in Manhattan in 1992 by lawyers Barry C. Sheck and Peter J. Neufeld. Directed by Jessica Sanders; USA; 2005. For showtimes call 412.682.4111 or visit www.pghfilmmakers.org.

Thru March 2, 2006
The White Countess
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Regent Square Theater, 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood
White Countess marks the end of a legendary relationship between director James Ivory and producer Ismail Merchant, who died last May. As in all 28 of their collaborations, this one blends high literary quality, beautiful period details, top-notch acting and social conscience - just what you'd expect. Set in 1930s Shanghai, it tells the love story of a blind American ex-diplomat (Ralph Fiennes) and a Russian countess (Natasha Richardson) who fled the Bolshevik Revolution and is now reduced to dancing in dingy bars. Directed by James Ivory; UK; 2005. For showtimes call 412.682.4111 or visit www.pghfilmmakers.org.

Wednesday, February 22, 2006, 7 pm
Sunday, February 26, 2006, 2 pm
Xerxes
Pittsburgh Opera
CAPA Theater, Downtown
The romance, the decadence of the Roaring 20s. Extravagantly beautiful music from one of history's most brilliant composers. Set in this unforgettable era, Handel's Baroque masterpiece overflows with dazzling melodies including the beloved "Ombra mai fu," and showcases the stellar talents of the Pittsburgh Opera Center. Xerxes, the mob Kingpin, is in love with his brother's girlfriend, the flapper Romilda. This romantic opera is jam-packed with love triangles and plot contortions, ultimately resolved in a surprising twist! Tickets $35; $16 students with ID. For more information or tickets call 412.456.6666 or visit www.pittsburghopera.org.

February 22 - 23, 2006, 7:30 pm
Malle at the Melwood Screening Room: Les Amants (The Lovers)
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Avenue, Oakland
Louis Malle (1932 - 1995) enjoyed a long, celebrated career marked by innovation and risk-taking. This series - on Wednesdays and Thursdays only, throughout January and February - features new 35mm prints of some of Malle's finest French films. This week features the great Jeanne Moreau in one of her finest roles as a bored provincial wife in a controversial film. A huge international success (due to its "explicit" love scene, now tame), this was also the film that got a theater manager arrested for exhibiting an obscene movie. For more information call 412.682.4111 or visit www.pghfilmmakers.org.

February 22 - March 5, 2006
Wicked-SOLD OUT
Pittsburgh Cultural Trust & PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh
Benedum Center for the Performing Arts, Downtown
Broadway's biggest blockbuster. Long before that girl from Kansas arrives in Munchkinland, two girls met in the land of Oz. One-born with emerald green skin-is smart, fiery and misunderstood. The other is beautiful, ambitious and very popular. How these two grow to become the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good Witch makes for the most spellbinding new musical in years. Visit www.pgharts.org for more details.

February 23 - 26, 2006
It's DeLovely - A Tribute to Cole Porter
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
Heinz Hall, Downtown
"Begin the Beguine," "Night and Day," "Away from It All," "From This Moment On," and "It's De-Lovely" are but a few of the hundreds of songs composed by the music genius Cole Porter. The incomparable Bobby Short will join Marvin Hamlisch and the Orchestra in a program of Cole Porter music. To purchase tickets or for more information visit www.pittsburghsymphony.org or call 412.392.3306.

February 23 - 26, 2006
Winter JazzFest
Pittsburgh Jazz Society
Rhythm House Café, 3029 Washington Pike, Bridgeville
The Pittsburgh Jazz Society is pleased to present four evenings of jazz, seminars and performances. Visit www.pittsburghjazz.org/fest05/fest05.html for a full schedule of activities and pricing details. Call 412.343.9555 for additional information.

February 24 - March 12, 2006
See Under: Lover
Open Stage Theatre
2835 Smallman Street, Strip District
Open Stage Theatre marks the closing of World War II and the Holocaust with this compelling play. A writer dares to explore his own history and that of his grandfather - a famous Jewish writer who was forced into a Scheherazade -like deal by the Commandant of a concentration camp. The prisoners morph into the characters of the stories which are passed down like fire, from hand to hand. Tickets $18; seniors $13; students $10. For more information visit www.proartstickets.org or call 412.394.3353.

Friday, February 24, 2006, 6 - 8 pm
Sweet Jazz - Donna Bailey with Mason Embry on piano and Sunny Sunseri on bass
Sweetwater Center for the Arts
200 Broad Street, Sewickley
The art center's talented vocal instructor Patrick Arena is back to host his annual Sweet Jazz music series which features talented and established local musicians in an intimate, after work atmosphere. Enjoy the hors d'oeuvres, wine, art and entertainment and start the week off on the right note! This week features Pittsburgh's popular vocalist Donna Bailey performing with Mason Embry on piano and Sunny Sunseri on bass. $15 Sweetwater members; $20 non-members. For more information visit www.sweetwaterartcenter.org or call 412.741.4405.

Friday, February 24, 2006, 5:30 pm
Good Friday: Wine Tasting & Films
The Andy Warhol Museum
117 Sandusky Street, North Side
Join The Warhol and big Burrito on the last Friday of every month for ongoing Good Fridays wine tastings. For more information or reservations (walk-ins are welcome) email wine@bigburrito.com. Film viewing of Harry Smith's Mahagonny begins at 7:30 pm. Tickets for film $7; includes Museum admission. For more information visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300.

February 24 - March 2, 2006
CSA: Confederate States of America
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Harris Theater, 809 Liberty Ave., Downtown
This mockumentary shows us what the US might've looked like had the South won the Civil War. The film is both a cutting political commentary and a clever parody of History Channel-type documentaries, complete with "archival" footage and talking heads interviews. Since its premier at Sundance last year, its presence in the US has been very limited. Directed by Kevin Willmott; 2004. For showtimes call 412.682.4111 or visit www.pghfilmmakers.org.

Saturday, February 25, 2006, 12 pm
Art at Noon Lecture: At Home at Tea Time - Tea Gowns 1870-1920
Frick Art & Historical Center
7227 Reynolds Street, Point Breeze
Do you picture Victorian women as buxom ladies with hourglass figures, tortured into shape by corsets and restrictive clothing? In this era, tea time provided a more relaxed moment to appear in genteel undress, a venue for fantasy and exotic garments known as robes d'interieurs. These garments planted the seeds of change for the 20th century silhouette. Dr. Anne Bissonnette, Curator of the Kent State Museum, speaks on the evolution of women's fashion and the influences that brought change to the era. Free and open to the public. For more information call 412.371.0600 or visit www.frickart.org.

Saturday, February 25, 2006, 7pm
Opening Reception: Faculty Show
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Filmmakers Galleries, 477 Melwood Avenue, Oakland
The Faculty Show features recent work culled from a collection of photography, film, video and installations produced by Filmmakers' diverse faculty of working artists. Free and open to the public. For more information please call 412.681.5449 or visit www.pghfilmmakers.org.

Saturday, February 25, 2006, 7 pm
Sunday, February 26, 2006, 2 pm
Black Box Series VI
LABCO Dance
Breathe Yoga Studios, 1113 E. Carson Steet, South Side
Tickets $5 and available at the door. For more information visit www.labcodance.net or call 800.607.0857.

Saturday, February 25, 2006, 8 pm
Paul Rishell & Annie Raines
Calliope: Pittsburgh Folk Music Society
Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland
W.C. Handy Award winners Paul & Annie have brought the blues up several notches over the past decade. Annie Raines is considered the best female blues harmonica player...ever. And Paul Rishell is unparalleled in his intensity, soulfulness and spine-tingling improvisations. You've heard them on lots of soundtracks and as regulars on A Prairie Home Companion. Don't miss a chance to hear them live! Tickets $25. For more information visit www.proartstickets.org or call 412.394.3353.

Sunday, February 26, 2006
We're Holden Puppets: "Patriotic Puppets"
Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
10 Children's Way, Allegheny Center, North Side
With shows at 1:00, 2:00 and 3:00 pm. We're Holden Puppets present "The Adventures of Baba Yaga." Guests are invited to make their own puppets in between performances. Free with museum admission. For more information call 412.322.5058 or visit www.pittsburghkids.org.

Sunday, February 26, 2006, 4pm
Music in Great Space Concert Series
The Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh
Shadyside Presbyterian Church, 5121 Westminster Place, Shadyside
For this special performances of the requiems of Fauré and Duruflé, the choir will perform under the direction of guest conductor Joseph Flummerfelt of Westminster Choir College and will be accompanied by organist J. Christopher Pardini. Tickets $10 adults; $5 seniors; students & children free. For more information on the Music in Great Space series call 412.682.4300 or visit www.shadysidepres.org.

Sunday, February 26, 2006, 7 pm
Visiting Artists Performance: Luis Recoder and Sandra Gibson
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Avenue, Oakland
These 2 New York artists offer an innovative performance and installation using film and light. Gibson and Recoder have shown their collaborative film performances and installations at film festivals, museums and galleries around the world, including France, Spain, Scotland, Germany, Japan and The Netherlands. Their light installation Light Spill, will be on view in the lobby/gallery through March 19. Admission $5. For more information visit www.pghfilmmakers.org.

Sunday, February 26, 2006, 7:30 pm
Naughty Gems: Employee's Entrance
Pittsburgh Filmmakers
Regent Square Theater, 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Edgewood
Sundays in February feature films from the pre-code era; after sound was introduced in film but before the restrictive "production code" was enforced in 1934, Hollywood produced some of the most sexually suggestive, socially daring films in its history. This Sunday features Roy del Ruth's comedy-drama. During the Depression the downtown department store was a fantasyland, an elegant place that offered the American dream to many a gal down on her luck. Loretta Young, a ruthless department store executive imposes his will on his work force. For more information call 412.682.4111 or visit www.pghfilmmakers.org.

Tuesday, February 28, 2006, 5 pm
Downbeat in the District: Tony Campbell
The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
Cabaret & Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown
The Cultural Trust extends its free live jazz concert series to year-round! Happy hour specials are available from 5-7 p.m. at the Backstage Bar. Kenia dubla will begin performing at the Backstage Bar at 8:00 p.m. For more information call 412.456.6666 or visit www.pgharts.org.

March 1 - 7, 2006

March 2 - April 2, 2006
Pyretown
City Theatre
1300 Bingham Street, South Side
Louise is the mother of three and separated from her husband. Harry is a man who was paralyzed in an accident and uses a wheelchair. John Belluso exposes their conflicting desires in this new love story. Tickets $15 - $40. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 412.431.2489 or visit www.citytheatrecompany.org.

New state law makes phony bands face the music

Post Gazette

Season Announcement

Dear School of Drama Community:

On Monday, February 27 at 4:30 PM in the Chosky Theatre, the details of next year's season will be announced.

At that time, we will have more comprehensive information on the work we will accomplish together next year than in previous season briefings. For example, all graduate and senior thesis directing projects will be confirmed. Guest director information also will be available.

Since the process to select titles for next year's offerings is unlike any we have undertaken previously and our approach to venue and schedule is evolving, it seems to me necessary that you attend.

This will be a unique opportunity to understand the context in which the season has been created, and our objectives moving forward.

As a result, this is one of the most important occasions for us to gather as a theatre community.

I look forward to seeing you all there.

Thanks,

Liz

PRG Provides Video System For Broadway-bound Lestat

Lighting&Sound America Online - News

After Image Show

we make money not art

Learn To Manage Your Anxiety And Stresses In Your Life

lifehack.org

There's no rest for the 'Wicked' - PittsburghLIVE.com

Tribune Review

'MONEY' TALKS

New York Post Online Edition: entertainment

'Lion King' Pounces onto Chinese Stage

Backstage

Teenagers love musicals! Broadway sees $$$

Casting - News: Show Business Weekly

Silvercup Studios Sets $1 Billion Complex

New York Times

Tuesday, February 21, 2006

Winter New Play Festival

CMU School of Drama Winter New Play Festival continues...

All performances are FREE and take place in the John Wells Studio in the
Purnell Center for the Arts. For more info: 412-268-2407.
Remaining schedule as follows:


CHERRY SMOKE
a play by James McManus
directed by Dan Rigazzi

"A fighter and his girl struggle for survival in a world destined to
crush them."
Wed 2/22 @ 7:30 PM
Fri 2/24 @ 4 PM
Sat 2/18 @ 8 PM

Thurs 3/2 @ 7:30 PM
Fri 3/3 @ 8 PM
Sat 3/4 @ 2 PM

THE RED CRAVAT
a play by Lulin Yu
directed by Matt Gray

"A young Chinese woman seeks revenge on the father who abandoned her and
her mother during the Cultural Revolution."
Thurs 2/23 @ 7:30 PM
Fri 2/24 @ 8 PM
Sat 2/25 @ 2 PM

Wed 3/1 @ 7:30 PM
Fri 3/3 @ 4 PM
Sat 3/4 @ 8 PM

Final Friday

School of Drama presents
Final Friday Cabaret

"If FOOD Be the Music of Love..."

Friday, February 24
11:00 pm
Rauh Theatre
$5.00

9 tips for running more productive meetings

43 Folders

Stars, yes, but not centre stage

Sydney Morning Hearald

Stage Preview: Actress followed different roads to Oz

Post Gazette

Reflective exhibit by 13 artists honors playwright August Wilson

Post Gazette

Massive Lighting Display Opened Turin Olympics

Projection, Lights and Staging News

Agents riled over new language in pilot talent deals

Yahoo! News

Too much too young

Guardian Unlimited | Arts features

Inside look at producing a musical

Boing Boing

Copyright office head denounces "big mistake" of extending copyright

Boing Boing

Springtime for B'way

New York Daily News - Theater

'Mission to Mercury,' a quirky homage to Freddie

Philadelphia Inquirer

Monday, February 20, 2006

Aesthetics Out of Bounds

Tom Smart Director of Museum Programs at the Frick Art and Historical Center, Pittsburgh "An Archive of Silent Conversations: Visiting Artists at the Frick" Monday, February 27, 2006 5:30 p.m. On the Carnegie Mellon campus - Baker Hall 136A (Adamson Wing)

The focus of Tom Smart's lecture will be based on the unique circumstances of his work at the Frick. As director of collections and exhibitions he pushes the boundaries of curatorial practice by creating new methods of understanding historical collections by juxtaposing them with contemporary artists' work. His approach is collaborative--he's worked with contemporary artists, among them Vik Muniz, Christian Milovanoff, Robin Becker and Linn Meyers, and with work by such artists as Dan Flavin and Kiki Smith in order to rethink the Frick collection through contemporary performance, installation, and object placement. Often artists have produced new works of art, taking specific works of historical art in the permanent collection of the Frick or that were on view at the Frick in traveling exhibitions.

Smart has recently been appointed Director of the McMichael Canadian Collection in Kleinburg, a community on the edge of Toronto. The McMichael is one of Canada's finest collections of work by the early twentieth-century painters known as "The Group of Seven," and by Canadian Inuit artists. In his new position he will be responsible for developing the collections and programs, including those involving contemporary artists, broadening its audience, and directing the operation.

Aesthetics Out of Bounds is a series of free public lectures being offered at Carnegie Mellon University during the fall 2005 and spring of 2006. Sponsored by the Center for the Arts in Society with a grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the series features a distinguished group of internationally recognized scholars who will discuss the plastic, visual, performing, and literary arts in multiple historical contexts. Drawing scholars from the United States and Europe, the series will chart out new directions in the fields of aesthetics, arts historiography, critical theory and visual culture for a broad and intellectually engaged audience.

For more information about the series please visit; http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/mwitmore/aesthetics/index.html

Monday Presentation

Attention Scenery-type People:

Ever wonder what the difference between Duvetyne and Commando Cloth is?

Wanna find out about the wonderful world of Spandex?

Are there any new curtain materials out there?

If you wonder about these and other fabric-related imponderables, then run, don't walk to

the ROSEBRAND show!

Peter Monahan from Rosebarnd North will be presenting a lecture/discussion on Scenic Fabrics. It should be highly informative- and free samples will be distributed to the first 30 lucky participants!

When: Monday, February 27th, 2PM
Where:Chosky Theatre

As there are no classes due to a faculty meeting, attendance by all TDs and Scenic Designers is HIGHLY ENCOURAGED. (Seriously, you should all want to go to this- it's highly informative, helpful information right from the source- and well worth your time. And, there's swag!)

Interactive Feature > Snappy Decor

The New York Times > Theater

*The Laramie Project*

The Tartan Online

Local high school musicals pop up like spring flowers

Post Gazette

Opera Review: Center's updated 'Xerxes' a roaring success

Post Gazette

Listen and cast your vote for best 'Burgh song

Post Gazette

A 'Q' miscue

Variety.com

A 'Phantom' family

TimesUnion.com

PlayFest: "Seagulls in a Cherry Tree"

OrlandoSentinel.com

Sunday, February 19, 2006

Computer Applications - AutoCAD: Floor Plan A

[14:05] SmallOutput: HI DAVE
[14:06] SmallOutput: so my autocad drawing...you don't want it in any particular size right?
[14:06] SmallOutput: mine looks quite puny
[14:06] SmallOutput: it just needs to be centered on the page?
[16:11] TiredEyes: you should print it as big as it can be on a letter size page
[16:11] TiredEyes: same as the last two
[16:11] TiredEyes: plot to fit
[16:15] SmallOutput: cool...THANK U
[16:16] TiredEyes: np

One ring to save our tourism industry

globeandmail.com : Print Edition

D is for Dada

Washington Post

Role in 'Macbeth' leads to 10 years of 'MacHomer'

Arizona Republic

How NOT to talk

Lifehacker

Cabaret Pittsburgh Breaks Off, Branches Out

Backstage

New York ShowPlane gets in the 'Game'

Post Gazette

2006-07 schedule for PNC Broadway Across America

Post Gazette

On Stage: Pittsburgh's Broadway series welcomes the Tony Express

Post Gazette

Tony winners, nominees pack upcoming PNC Broadway schedule - PittsburghLIVE.com

Tribune Review

Artists try to capture August Wilson's urban experience - PittsburghLIVE.com

Tribune Review

Wicked cool - PittsburghLIVE.com

Tribune Review

Students learn more from teachers who hand-wave

Boing Boing

MIKE WEATHERFORD: 'Avenue Q' puts on a happy face

reviewjournal.com

What the heck's a dramaturg?

Chicago Tribune

Their 'aaay' game is back

LA Times

'Revelations' revealed

LA Times

Saturday, February 18, 2006

More funds coming, more needed for Wilson center

Post Gazette

CHEAP TRICKS

New York Post Online Edition: entertainment

A Public Servant Takes His Message to the Stage

New York Times

Theater Review - 'Heddatron'

Ben Brantley - New York Times

Rolling Stones Rocking Rio de Janeiro

VOA News

Conservatory Hour

Monday, Feb. 20 we will have a critique of the new works "Another Day on Willow Street" and "Samaritan".

As usual, we will meet in the Checco Studio A at 4:30pm.


The following week, Feb. 27 will be the presentation of the 2006-07 season.

Barefoot in the Park

Hey Dave- You should post this review of "Barefoot in the Park" from the NY Times because it has a lot to say about the design of it and there's an interesting audio slide show about the set design.

OK, here you go:

Review - Theater - New York Times

and there's this:

Did Critics Fall in Love with the Revival of Barefoot in the Park?

from yesterday and:

Mizrahi Costumes 'Barefoot in the Park'

from several days ago.

Friday, February 17, 2006

ULS

MONDAY, February 20--
A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE
4:30 PM, Adamson, Baker Hall 146A

Asi Burak and Eric Brown of
the Entertainment Technology Center
will talk about

THE PEACEMAKER project
"PeaceMaker is a Videogame simulation of the Israelu-Palestinian conflict: a tool that can be used to promote a peaceful resolution, among Israel;is, Palestiniant and young adults worldwide"


It was used successfully in a course last semester on our Doha campus...

=============================================================
THURSDAY , February 23
SPECIAL TALK connected with the current show of the Drama Season
Nathan the Wise

4:30 PM, Adamson
Thursday, February 23rd

Sarah Bryant-Bertail
Associate Professor of Theory and Criticism, School of Drama, University of Washington

Lessing's NATHAN THE WISE: Reviving Utopia
From its Enlightenment origins to the present day, Lessing's NATHAN THE WISE has retained its double status as both a canonized classic of German theater and a lightning rod through which conflicting social values have been channeled and debated. Lessing's Jerusalem, set during the crusades, ends as a precarious utopia where Jews, Moslems, and Christians live in peace, a scenario and a site that still allows us to stage and to question our own visions of utopia, a utopia now shadowed by violence on every side.

=========================================================

Slideshow: Students bring Shakespeare's works to life

Post Gazette

The Causes of Procrastination And How To Conquer Them

lifehack.org

‘Sleeping on it’ best for complex decisions

lifehack.org

For some, the scandal is nothing but tragic, but for others it may soon become a musical

The Boston Globe

Did Critics Fall in Love with the Revival of Barefoot in the Park?

Broadway.com Buzz

Stories to Dance To

Pittsburgh City Paper - Performance

PUTTING A STOP TO IT

Chicago Tribune

Turning sights into sounds

Chicago Tribune

Thursday, February 16, 2006

Felllow CNC router enthusiasts

Ron Tatum from Allegheny Educational Systems (our MasterCam distributor) will be here this Monday afternoon at 1:30, ostensibly to give us a better understanding of how to create 3-D toolpaths on the router.

I realize this may not be an ideal time for everyone, but finding a hole in Ron's schedule has proven to be difficult.

CFA Annoucements

CFA Centennial____________________________________________

What is the Beaux Arts Ball? A costumed art party to celebrate the College of Fine Arts centennial anniversary

What do you get for your ticket price? food, beverages, music, various entertainment, oxygen bar and costume prizes! Prizes awarded in these categories:

Flashiest
Most Gorgeous
Most Audacious
Shadiest Character
Most Light-hearted
Special prize for Group Enterprise

$40 for Students
$75 for Alumni, Faculty, Staff

Call 412-268-2407 or visit the School of Drama box office in the Purnell Center for the Arts between noon- 5 p.m. February 28 is the last day for tickets!

Campus Events____________________________________________

Developed by two students at Entertainment Technology Center, this project (PeaceMaker) has attracted significant interest from governments abroad, US politicians, schools in public policy, elementary and secondary schools interested in conflict resolution and all the related topics. I've seen a demo of this project and it's incredible. Don't miss the opportunity to experience and learn about the development of this project!
cathy


Monday February 20th
4:30PM - Adamson Wing, 136A Baker Hall

The PeaceMaker project:

PeaceMaker is a cross-cultural political video game simulation of the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict which was developed under the auspices of the
Entertainment Technology Center.

In PeaceMaker, the player takes the role of either the Israeli or
Palestinian Prime Minister. The player must act and react to in game
events in order to establish a stable resolution to the conflict before
his or her term in office is up. Peace is a fragile and difficult goal to
achieve, but as this game will show, it is the only way to resolve one of
the longest running conflicts mankind has ever faced.

In this session members of the PeaceMaker team will demonstrate the
playable game and discuss the ins and outs of its production. Attendees
will learn how the game was built to provide a balanced view of the
conflict as much as possible and how it mixes real-world reports and
fictional gameplay experiences to provide a unique approach to the player.

_______________

Hadrian Predock of Predock Frane Architects will present a lecture of his work on Monday, February 20th at 6:30 in the Theater of the Carnegie Museum of Art. This is the Hans Vetter Memorial lecture, co-sponsored by the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Heinz Architectural Center of the Carnegie Museum of Art. All are welcome to attend. Please forward this message to any interested parties.

www.arc.cmu.edu/lectureseries
www.predockfrane.com/

Predock_Frane Architects was established in Santa Monica, California in 2000 as a collaborative research and development architecture studio. For the last five years, the firm has attempted to weave together a series of explorations that deal with oppositions, analogues/site specificity, the erosion of traditional disciplinary boundaries and environmental intelligence. They feel that these areas are present in the current world landscape, ripe with potential, yet under-explored in the built world.

Architectural Record named Predock_Frane one of ten emerging international architects in 2002. This year Predock_Frane was selected as one of eight architects by the Architectural League of New York for the emerging voices lecture series. They recently won a series of awards for The Center of Gravity Foundation Hall - a Zen Buddhist Monastery in Northern New Mexico, and for the new Family Room at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Last year they were chosen as one of six architects to represent the United States in the US Pavilion at the 2004 Biennale in Venice Italy, and were short listed as a finalist for the Denver Museum of Contemporary Art. Current Projects include: the Transcending Type exhibition at the Yale school of architecture, The Inn at the French Laundry in Yountville, CA in collaboration with Antoine Predock, a hybrid contemporary art space and restaurant in Phoenix, AZ, an artist studio in Venice, CA, a writers space in Los Angeles, a housing project in Los Angeles, and ‘twin residences’ in Pacific Palisades, CA. They have been published widely and have lectured throughout the country.

John Frane was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and received his BArch in 1993 from the University of Texas at Austin. Hadrian Predock was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and received his MArch in 1993 from Harvard's Graduate School of Design.

PGH Events________________________________________________

Opera Theater presents an exciting double bill of Benjamin Britten's beloved Noye's Fludde and multifaceted artist Jay Bolotin's innovative, woodcut motion picture opera, The Jackleg Testament, March 2-5. Enjoy two thematically connected but artistically divergent pieces in this one thrilling evening of opera!
Opera Theater is joined in retelling the ageless tale of Noye's Fludde by talented young performers from the Pittsburgh High School for the Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA) who take on the roles of the animals onboard Noah's ark. In addition to the children's voices, the voice of God, a skeptical Noah, and a very reluctant Mrs. Noah are all heard in this imaginative musical adventure. The opera also features the orchestra as hammers during the ark's construction and raindrops hitting the roof during the flood.

This familiar tale is energized by the original designs of local elementary and middle school students who created masks and animal designs for the production under the guidance of artist Cindy Snodgrass.
THE JACKLEG TESTAMENT

"A remarkable film . . . vividly imagined . . . darkly funny . . . an uplifting experience"-- San Diego Union Tribune


Internationally celebrated artist-musician Jay Bolotin conjures up a unique view of the story of Adam and Eve in The Jackleg Testament, the first movie-opera made from woodcuts. In this innovative film, Nobodaddy (the voice of God, sung by Bolotin) glides through a woodcut Garden of Eden, inhabited by Jack (sung by lyric tenor Nigel Robeson), Eve (sung by Karen Berquist), and a wily Serpent (sung by Wagnerian bass-baritone Monte Jaffe).

Opera Theater is the only performing arts company presenting The Jackleg Testament which has been touring leading American visual arts spaces in the U.S. since its debut in May 2005. The Jackleg Testament follows the acclaimed Opera Theater world-premiere of creator Jay Bolotin's sculpture opera LIMBUS.

Although The Jackleg Testament is an animated film, parental discretion should be used with younger children since it contains strong language and figure nudity that some parents might find inappropriate. Parents with young children are encouraged to view images from the woodcut opera at http://www.semantikon.com/medium/jaybolotinfeature.htm to determine if it is suitable for their children.
PERFORMANCE DETAILS:

Thursday, March 2 7pm

Friday, March 3 8 pm

Saturday, March 4 8 pm

Sunday, March 5 3 pm



CAPA Theater, Pittsburgh High School for the Creative and Performing Arts

111 Ninth St., Downtown Pittsburgh

Tickets

$20; $15 students and children

Call for family and group discounts.

For show information or to purchase tickets, please call 412-394-3353 or visit www.proartstickets.org

_____________________

WIN THE WICKED LOTTERY!

Seats for $25

Lottery begins Wednesday, February 22, 2006, at The Box Office at Theater Square, 655 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh


A day-of-performance lottery for a limited number of $25 seats will be held daily for WICKED, beginning with its first performance Wednesday, February 22, 2006, and continuing through its engagement, Sunday, March 5, 2006 at the Benedum Center for the Performing Arts.

Each day, 2 hours prior to curtain, ticket buyers can arrive at the Box Office at Theater Square, located at 655 Penn Avenue diagonally across from the Benedum Center, to have their names placed in a hat where 30 minutes later, names will be drawn for the limited orchestra-level seats at $25 each. This lottery is available only in-person at the box office, with a limit of two tickets per person, cash only.

WICKED, the smash hit Broadway musical, tells the story of two unlikely friends and their remarkable odyssey in the Land of Oz. One, born with emerald-green skin, is smart, fiery and misunderstood. The other is beautiful, ambitious and very popular. How these two friends grow to become the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good Witch makes for one of the most spellbinding musicals in years.

WICKED features music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz (Godspell, Pippin, Academy Award winner for Pocahontas and The Prince of Egypt) and book by Winnie Holzman ("My So Called Life," "Once And Again" and "thirtysomething") based on the 1995 novel by Gregory Maguire. The musical is directed by 2003 Tony Award winner Joe Mantello (Take Me Out, Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, A Man of No Importance) and features musical staging by Tony Award winner Wayne Cilento (Aida, The Who's Tommy, How To Succeed...). WICKED features set design by Eugene Lee (Ragtime, Show Boat, Tony Award winner for Candide and Sweeney Todd), costume design by Susan Hilferty (Tony nominated for the recent Into the Woods), lighting design by Kenneth Posner (Tony nominated for Hairspray) and sound design by Tony Meola (The Lion King and the recent Man of La Mancha). Stephen Oremus is the show's musical director. Orchestrations are by William David Brohn, with dance arrangements by James Lynn Abbott.

WICKED, is produced by Marc Platt, Universal Pictures, The Araca Group, Jon B. Platt and David Stone.


WICKED began performances on Broadway on Wednesday, October 8, 2003 at The Gershwin Theatre and continues to be the top-grossing show on Broadway. For more information about WICKED, log on to www.wickedthemusical.com.

A limited number of tickets to WICKED ($29-$72.50) may still be purchased at the Box Office at Theater Square from 7 a.m.-9 a.m. Performances will be held Tuesday-Thursday at 7:30 p.m.; Friday at 8 p.m.; Saturday at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; and Sunday at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. There will be a special matinee performance at 2 p.m. on Thursday, February 23, and an ASL-interpreted performance will be held on Sunday, March 5, at 1 p.m. For box office information, please call (412) 456-6666 or visit www.pgharts.org.

CMU "Focus" Article

Jem Glaciator for Bangkok’s Ratchada Theatre

LIve Design

$6.5 Million Pledge for Kent State

Live Design

ABTT Theatre Show Presents Pan-Technical Solutions

Live Design

Disney settles Lion song dispute

BBC NEWS | Entertainment

Avenue Q - Las Vegas

Theater - New York Times

Stage Review: Cute puppies steal 'Sylvia' show

Post Gazette

Stage Review: New Horizon's 'Purlie Victorious' pushes stereotypes to comic effect

Post Gazette

Japan's kabuki theater seeks to revive former glory

Yahoo! News

Disney's Sklar exits Imagineering job for parks post

Yahoo! News

How much do you need to retire? -

lifehack.org

Edward Albee on the state of theater — and lazy Americans

The Seattle Times

Tales of the Lost Formicans

Pittsburgh City Paper - Performance

New Yorkers seek high-class love at the opera

Stage Article | Reuters.com

Hodgetts & Fung to design downtown theater

LA Times

Wednesday, February 15, 2006

Job - Full Time - CA

ABC Enlists Color Kinetics for Extreme Makeover: Home Edition

Lighting&Sound America Online - News

Avenue Q to Close in Las Vegas May 28 for Marauding Knights of Spamalot

Playbill News

Caught in the act: PlayFest theatergoers offer feedback

OrlandoSentinel.com: Theater

Mizrahi Costumes 'Barefoot in the Park'

CBS News

Did David Harrower's Blackbird Soar with London Critics?

Broadway.com Buzz

Olympic Ceremonies Employ Four Lighting Consoles

Projection, Lights and Staging News

Youth takes center stage in 'James' - PittsburghLIVE.com

Tribune Review

Mulling a Bay Area Move?

Backstage

Former Livent official wants charges dismissed

globeandmail.com

News: Show Business Weekly

A theatrical makeover for Governors Island

Theater News - Theater News: Avenue Q Vegas Production to Shut Down May 28 -

Theatre Mania

VIEW / DEATH OF A BALLET COMPANY / Harsh business climate and loss of a venue were blows, but what finally doomed an Oakland institution were artistic

San Francisco Chronicle

Tuesday, February 14, 2006

Arts Action Alert FYI

President Bush today sent his FY 2007 budget request to Congress, beginning the yearly appropriations process for the nation's cultural agencies and programs, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Office of Museum Services (OMS), Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), and the Department of Education's Arts in Education programs. We urge you to write your Members of Congress and tell them to support increased funding for the nation's arts programs.

For FY 2007, the President has requested level funding for the NEA at $124.4 million and for the NEH at $141 million. However, the Administration once again attempts to re-distribute $3.46 million out of the longstanding and Congressionally-popular NEA Challenge America program in favor of more general grant support and administrative salary and overhead costs. Challenge America is a highly effective program, which uses the arts to enhance America’s communities through grants for arts education and improved access to the arts for all Americans, especially in underserved communities.

For the sixth consecutive year, the President's budget has eliminated funding for the Department of Education's Arts in Education programs, which include funding for model arts programs and collaborations with schools, teacher professional development, and arts programs for at-risk youth. Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert Lynch responded to the Administration's budget request with the following statement:

"Rather than zeroing out the Department of Education’s arts education programs, President Bush should ask for an increase. His State of the Union address recognized that we need to prepare a 21st-century workforce by fostering talent and creativity. While his American Competitiveness Initiative would substantially increase investments in math and science education, we also believe that one of the best ways to nurture creativity is to have children learn and actively participate in the arts. Studies show that students who participate in the arts are not only more likely to participate in a math and science fair but also out-perform their peers on the SATs by 87 points."

The President's budget also recommends cutting $53.5 million from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting in FY 2007. As a trusted community resource, CPB uses the power of noncommercial television and radio to enrich the lives of all Americans through quality programs and education services. And finally on a more positive note, the President requested a funding boost of $4 million for the Office of Museum Services, bringing the total OMS budget to $36 million. A breakdown of the President's buget requests are as follows:

Federally Funded Arts Programs

Enacted FY06 (in millions)

President’s Request FY07 (in millions) National Endowment for the Arts 124.41 124.41 National Endowment for the Humanities 141 141 Office of Museum Services within IMLS 31.8 36 U.S. Dept. of Education’s Arts in Ed 35.3 0 Corporation for Public Broadcasting 396 347

As you know, the President's budget is the first step in the appropriations process. While it serves as an important framework, Congress has the power to set its own priorities and change these funding levels. That's where you come in.

Arts advocates can make their voices heard by writing their Members of Congress and urging them to increase funding for arts and culture and restore funding for arts in education programs. We have provided you with a customizable letter to send to your Members of Congress, as well as several talking points to help you craft your message. We recommend you add your own thoughts and stories about why the arts are important to you and your community. We also encourage you to join us in Washington, DC for Arts Advocacy Day, March 13-14, 2006. You'll have the opportunity to visit your Members of Congress face-to-face and urge them to support the arts.

If you have any questions, please contact Justin Beland, Government Affairs and Grassroots Manager, at jbeland@artsusa.org. Thank you for your continued support of the arts!