CMU School of Drama

Friday, April 07, 2017

Mimi Choi Makeup: Best Instagram Photos & Optical Illusions

collegecandy.com: Makeup is art and any makeup lover can agree with me on that. Whether you’re wearing makeup for a more natural look or wanting that full beat, your face is the canvas to tons of creative styles and artistic looks. But 31-year-old Mimi Choi uses makeup in a different and more astonishing way: optical illusions.

6 comments:

Alexa James-Cardenas said...

This is so cool! I love abnormal makeup styles, and really the personalities they take on. It makes me think of companies like Cirque Du Soliel, but I wonder how could makeup like this be integrated into classic theatre. I mean, it would have to be a show that can call for such makeup, but I do think it would be interesting have a show where the characters each had individual intricate (optical illusions or not) makeup, and then have the plot be something very, well, normal play format. It would probably be a weird experience, but one that does bring in an interesting element and layer to the whole of the play. Would people react to the characters differently, because of the contouring of their face? (which could be a study on people’s empathy and where/who do people put more of their sympathy towards) Or would the makeup be too distracting overall for the audience to pay close attention to anything else? I definitely would want to try a study like that, and see what would happen.

Zak Biggins said...

Like Alexa, I am also intrigued by unconventional make up styles. I think they have a huge place in society both as artistic expression and as statements of societal norms. I have always been drawn to productions with intricate makeup designs because I think it helps create a visual representation of the character or the plot via the face. At Carnegie Mellon, actors used to be required to take a stage make-up class before they graduated. Recently, this class was removed from their schedule, and I could not disagree with the removal more wholeheartedly. There are so many onstage jobs in the industry, in fact I would say most onstage jobs in the industry, where actors are given a face chart and expected to replicate it each night. With this type of actor training, productions are able to save a lot of money because they don't have to hire a resident makeup artist. I hope that at some point in my training at CMU I will be encouraged to engage and explore in unconventional makeup styles.

Vanessa Ramon said...

I have not so secretly always loved the use of makeup in this way. I could spend hours watching videos of people transforming their face into characters, people, and so much more just through the use of makeup. I agree with the article when it says that makup is art. As most girls know, its not as easy as it looks to put pigment on your face and actually make it look good. This is why I'm always so fascinated by the modified technique these arts create when working on their face. Unlike other artists who start on blank canvases or sculpt shapes of their own, makeup artists have to take account for the shadows and contours of each individual face they work on. Like I have said, I am always fascinated with the amount of skill and patience goes into creating just one of these looks. Art through make up is art that is detailed and animated and done with great skill.

Simone Schneeberg said...

I hate that makeup carries such a stigma of just being pretty or just being costumey. Make up is art. Even when you are "just being pretty," you are creating art. Like Vanessa said above, it is not easy to color match your skin or to get the precision of a good cat eye, or to blend and even smokey eye. I came from an arts high school, where this was the predominant view of makeup. It really was art. People would experiment with colors and shapes, with eye liner, with lipstick, with eye shadow. There was minimal stigma regarding wearing make up "for guys" or wearing it because you didn't think you were pretty. People were makeup as self expression. This is the view that I wish people could adopt outside the walls of that high school. Especially now with trends like easy to wash off body glitter and "unicorn eyeliner," make up is really becoming more of an art form and I think it is about time we accept it as such.

Sarah Battaglia said...

I love this article and I am so excited to see makeup being more recognized as an art and something that is to be celebrated and rewarded as one because not only does it take a lot of hard work and precision it also changes the way that we talk about makeup and about beauty. It makes makeup more of an art and a fashion choice rather than a necessity and something that is required to make a woman beautiful. I think with things like cos play unconventional makeup as also become something that we consider to be normal and something to be celebrated. Makeup much like fashion is a form of self expression and we all should be able to wear it in whatever way we want if i makes us more comfortable. I love this article because not once does it mention makeup as a thing that makes this woman more beautiful but rather as a tool for her art.

Tahirah K. Agbamuche said...

Whoaaa, this looks are so incredibly trippy. I was not expecting this when I clicked on the link. It is amazing not just how talented people are, but how creative they learn to be with that talent. I imagine time and a love for makeup is also required. I wish there was a tutorial, although I am sure I would struggle since everyday makeup still confuses me to the moon and back. I cannot quite decide if I love the distortion, or if it just freaks me out because it just looks so real! I wonder if her looks need to be photographed a certain way. Her swirl face look is one of the most terrifying things I have ever seen, yet it is somehow inviting. I keep wondering “what is she doing with her eyes?” I would definitely love to take a class from her, she seams to have some magic up her sleeves I would love to have in my toolbelt!

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