CMU School of Drama

Friday, March 17, 2017

Broadway Stars Align to Help 'Hamilton' Chef Open Hell's Kitchen Restaurant

DNAinfo New York: After construction issues delayed by several months the opening of a restaurant helmed by the caterer for the cast of "Hamilton," he turned to the Broadway community for help.

“Monies have run out and so is our time,” the chef — who for years has catered for popular Broadway shows, including “Wicked” and “Kinky Boots" — wrote on his business’ Facebook page last week.

7 comments:

Marisa Rinchiuso said...

This a great heart warming story! You always hear about how Broadway is like a family, but this really exemplifies it. It is incredible that even during their busy lives, they help out someone who has been quietly supporting them. I had no clue that the relationship between shows and catering was so tight knit. It must be a huge transition to go from catering to a storefront. I'm glad that he asked for help because so many people were ready to be there. That's the amazing thing about artists; when you need help, they always find a way. Thinking about the charitable things that artists, even Broadway in particular do, is incredible. Seeing the good that come out of organizations like Broadway Cares, really reminds me that art is bigger than a show or a project; art reflects and gives back to the community. I think this story sets a great example to future artists.

Evan Schild said...

This story is so heartwarming. It is incredible that so many people want to help a fellow friend follow their dream. Being on a Broadway schedule is very hard and time consuming. It is incredible that so many people still came and volunteered their time and effort to help a friend. One thing that is truly inspiring is the fact that he started out as a caterer and then he transitioned into opening a fully operational restaurant. I had seen the go fund me on my Facebook page and it seemed that when there was issues with the contractor it seemed more of a problem. Not in this article but on the go fund me it said that they basically stole his idea and then left him and started their own company. Its amazing that a member of Wicked started the go fund me and I believe that they will easily be able to make their goal amount.

Megan Jones said...

This is such a sweet story! It's so nice to know that these Broadway artists and technicians selflessly helped someone in need. People always say that you should never burn any bridges in this industry, and this really shows that this is true. Catering is a part of the entertainment industry that people to tend to forget about a lot, but their work is essential to Broadway productions. As this chef has previously served the Broadway community people were quick to jump in and help him. People helped to build and install the restaurant, and even gave over $15,000 to help him pay the backlogged rent. They all used their varied skills to make sure that he was able to achieve his dreams. Honestly it all goes back to the golden rule, treat others the way that you want to be treated. You never know when you'll need help from others, just like this chef did.

Simone Schneeberg said...

This is the thing I really love about the theater community, and really arts community as a whole, everyone bonds very quickly and is extremely willing to lend a hand to the people they know and care about. Having gone to art school for high school, that was the atmosphere. Everyone acted like they knew each other on a personal level nearly the second they were introduced and if anyone needed help there was always a big response of willing and helpful hands. Working with more technology and engineering focused people these past two years, I've found the environment a lot colder. People are more adversarial and less community oriented. It's harder to get people to find a time in their busy schedule to even help out friends; and when they do, it's help given with less enthusiasm, less commitment, and less heart than I've found in the arts world. Also, fun fact, I am pretty sure that Randy's husband is an assistant principal at my high school (Dr. Mark Stricklin).

Claire Farrokh said...

Aw well that's very nice. One of the best things about working in the arts is the level of bonding and willingness to help that generally occurs. It's really wonderful to see that that helpfulness and selflessness goes beyond educational theatre into the "real world." This is so sweet and refreshing to read. I'm glad that in today's rather selfish environment, people are still there for the people they care about. Like Megan said, it's really incredible to see such a prime example of how important it is to maintain relationships and connections in this business. You'll never know when you will need a Broadway cast-sized fleet of helpers when you are opening your own restaurant. Generally these connections are useful for things like getting a role or a job, but it is so nice to see that they can be used for other, more unique things. It's also great to see how much initiative his castmates and friends took, to the point of raising money for him, all without his request.

Zak Biggins said...

This story is absolutely incredible. This industry is very competitive, however, a story like this is so reassuring that the broadway community is a collaborative and caring one. I was in new york for spring break and was forunate enough to see a few shows and after each performance the respective casts all had a curtain speech fundraising for broadway cares equity fights aids. Each show had their own unique twist on how to ask for money but it was beautiful that every show was on the same side fighting for the same cause. This story of the chef reminded me of that very much. Megan summed it up perfectly when she described how important it is to maintain good relationships in this industry. I have heard a few stories of actors not being able to get work because of the way they treated people when they were first getting started. I mean Leonardo must have done something to anger someone because it took him basically the majority of his career to be recognized by award committees.

Claire Krueger said...

This article is the culmination of impressive networking to a new degree. Usually it's some knows someone and you get a job but in this case Randy’s networking in the form of friendships got him top of the line workers and labor for no cost at all. While it's cynical to address it in the form of networking instead of friends helping each other out it hold a certain amount of truth. As one of the volunteers puts it “If you had to describe Randy, you’d describe him as someone who’s always up, who’s always smiling, and who’s always giving a handshake and a hug.” Randys overall attitude was essentially turned into a huge monetary asset in a time of need that payed off his efforts in the end. I’m assuming he was authentically a good person, but in a hypothetical situation even if you hated everyone acting like you enjoyed their presence in a realistic fashion would be short term beneficial to the people around you and long term beneficial to you. And it goes to show always be friends with the stage hands and behind the scenes workers.

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