CMU School of Drama

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Glue Wood Joints Together Without Any Clamps Using Super Glue

lifehacker.com: Wood glue takes a while to set, and that can be a problem when you can’t use a clamp to hold the two pieces in place. For situations like that, a little super glue is all you need.

7 comments:

Marisa Rinchiuso said...

This video/article was very nifty! Unlike the other articles we often encounter on the blog, it did not have some higher meaning or incredible event, it was just how to make day to day life in technical theatre a bit easier. I for one am very new to glues and common adhesive knowledge. Before CMU I had only used super glue, Sobo and hot glue. I have learned, might I add very quickly, that glues do not work on all sorts of surfaces. (this total.com has really helped my through my first projects) It can be very confusing to try and navigate construction when you don't understand connectors. When starting on a project we all see the big picture, the end, and perhaps the steps towards that, but what about the baby steps in between each one? It's the little things like glues that we come in contact with on such a regular basis that making it even 5 minutes quicker can take hours off a project. That is why I thought this video was very helpful to us as artists.

Mark Ivachtchenko said...

When I first read the title, I (and probably any other woodworker) was like what in hells name--who would use super glue over wood glue? However, after watching the video, I realized he's mainly focusing on smaller crafts to medium sized pieces and not giant walls or sets. Also, he wasn't completely getting rid of the wood glue in the equation. So, in this case, super glue is a great substitute if you can't manage to clamp something at that moment due to lack of clamps or unusual glue up. Also, when he mentions the molding, this sounds like a great trick because a clamp could bend the wood easily and ruin the delicate carvings in the piece. The super glue might not work amazing on a piece that spans a large length, for example, molding on a wall, because of the high leverage. Also, for large set pieces or pieces that are bulky and heavy that gravity tends to pull down hard will need clamps so, this little tip won't cut it. This seems like a great application in the prop shop though where there is plenty of delicate woodworking to go around.

Jasmine Lesane said...

This is dope! I wish I had learned this method before finishing Basic Design, which is the literally epitome of small unclampable shapes. Some of me and my friends use to use masking tape to hold our pieces together, but this could fail really easily if gravity wasn’t on your side. So awesome tip, I also appreciate how the video creator showed us this things breaking point because I feel that it increased his credibility. Once you know the super glues limits you know how it can be used.

On another note I think this is a really cool example of how science informs art. I know that the TD goal is working with engineering and materials to meet artistic visions, but it is still cool to see an example where it is good to know how different products work. It is good to know a type of glues pro’s and con’s. This information can save you a lot of time.

Tahirah Agbamuche said...

In my stagecraft mini we're currently working in carpentry and DR just gave us a lesson on wood glue and clamps, so this is extremely relevant to what I'm learning at the moment. Growing up, I used super glue on everything until I discover my grand fathers wood glue and fell in love with it, so I was well aware how tedious it is to wait on the glue to dry. Clamps were a solution, but as the video states, dosen't work for all shapes. I was super excited to learn about this technique and I'm curious to try it out and see how it holds. I'm a little skeptical since the youtuber was ale to break apart his two pieces of wood so easily. Also, wouldn't the gaps in the wood allow for a higher probability of the two pieces coming apart? I think this is a really cool idea, but may only be helpful if you're planning to have reinforcement latter, like screws.

Chris Calder said...

Clamping something you just glued is never an easy task. It is either impossible or just when you have the pieces in the right place something slips. I have lost count of the number of times I’ve had the clamp move the two piece because they weren’t exactly perpendicular to each other. This definitely seems like a valid solution to this problem, but my one concern is the white residue that is left behind by the super glue and how that affects the wood. I would be curious to see if the glue companies begin to add the chemical into their preexisting glue formula and if that would have the same effect. Also, one benefit that the clamps offer is constant pressure driving the wood glue into the pores of the wood. I wouldn’t think the super glue would have that same ability. In conclusion, this is a very cool idea and during my next wood project, I will have to give it a shot.

Evan Smith said...

I don’t think I’ve ever thought of using super glue for an application like this. Then again it’s been awhile since I’ve used super glue. I always think of it to be a last resort or a permanent solution to fixing things. Looking at the video it does look like it does a decent job at doing what you want to do. Also assuming that the application is dependent on the size of the material you are working with. What is the limit before you can’t use superglue anymore or is that just a way you would have to factor in more surface area for the super glue to be used on? I’ve always found it awkward to just hold two pieces of wood together until the glue dries, and then when you think it has dried it decides to shift on you, so much for spending time trying to do something right, when it looks like it can be done quick and easy.

Daniel Silverman said...

I think this is a great little tip. I’m not sure that this is anything new, but it is a trick to keep in mind. When I’m building scenery, I glue all joints unless I’m told not to. The super glue adds just a bit of extra holding power to keep pieces together while the wood glue is drying. Working in the theater, typically we will be able to clamp or use other fasteners. This is a great idea for someone who can’t add clamps or is very concerned about the veneer or clamp marks. I don’t think hot glue is a good idea, as the article might suggest, because it can leave a larger bead which may interfere with the wood glue. I try to always keep superglue around for when I might need it, but I never thought of using it on wood before. And, even though superglue is strong and dries quickly, it may not be the end all be all of glue.

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